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Telling a History 02 – Theory of Repetition [Column_Tracksides]

abandoned-rail_02.jpg: spur abandoned in 1986. Osaka-ko, Osaka, Japan. 1986

Here, I’m considering the characteristics of the history among our hobby.

Most of our histories are told by the hobbyists. The passing of the object of hobby would be a nightmare for these hobbyists /historians. How does a historian recover from this wound?

Sigmund Freud studied wounded soldiers’ repeatedly dreamed wounds during the WW-1. From here, he extracted the theory of repetition. According to the theory, we repeatedly dream wounds to recover from the wounds.

We think we normally forget the wound to recover from it. But, the wound which should have been forgotten hides somewhere in the mind, where we call unconscious. This creates the repetitious nightmarish dreams. For what? To reduce the mental load, says Freud. Freud tells us that repetitious nightmarish dreams help us recover from the wound by addressing it in our mind.

As I wrote before, passing of the subject of the history would be a wound for the historian. Thus, if we can recognize the descriptions of retirements or abandonments as unconscious descriptions, we can recognize that a historian describes the retirements or abandonments to reduce his/her mental load.

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Telling a History 01 – Characteristic of Our History [Column_Tracksides]

abandaned-rail_01.jpg: spur abandoned in 1986. Osaka-ko, Osaka, Japan. 1986

History creates identity. And, our hobby has a factor of historical studies. Therefore, I think our hobby would help establishing our identity. Does a community or a nation.

One gives evidences to tell a history. In some cases, evidences take form of matters like remains, photos or papers. In other cases, evidences take form of abstraction like narration. However, even if one represents these evidences, the history told is a creation of the particular teller. Accordingly, there are many characteristics in telling a history.

One of the characteristics in telling a history among our enthusiasm is that we often ask for the retirements or abandonments. These items are rare in standard histories, as standard histories follow the beginnings to describe the development, but not the demises.

For example, many standard design histories mention of the introduction of the PRR GG1 locomotive designed by Raymond Loewy. But few represent its entire life. Contrary to these histories, our histories often have both built dates and retired dates. Indeed, retired dates are useful in fits-my-era judging. But it may not be the only reason.

My question is that where this characteristic came from. Also is that what this characteristic work for. My guess is that it first comes from and works for the history teller himself, because the history told is a creation of the teller.

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CO K-4 #2716 [CO Photo Archive]

co_c01.jpg co_02.jpg: Louisville, KY spring, 1971

At the Kentucky Railway Museum in Louisville, found this preserved locomotive . This is CO K-4 class Kanawha (Berkshire) #2716. The locomotive was built in 1944 by ALCO and retired in 1956. She arrived at KRM in 1959.

This photo was first appeared in my column "Virtual Trip with The Guide".

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GN S-2 #2584 [GN Photo Archive]

gn_c02.jpg
gn_s2_2.jpg: Havre, MT summer, 1971

Next to the ex-GN Havre Passenger Station, sits this steam locomotive.
This is GN S-2 class Northern #2584. The locomotive was built in 1930 by Baldwin and retired in 1957. She sits here since 1964.

This photo was first appeared in my column mentioning Vanderbilt tenders.

gn_s2.jpg: Havre, MT summer, 1971

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SM #107 and #206 [SM Photo Archive]

sm_01.jpg: Knoxville, TN autumn, 1970

On route 441 from Knoxville to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, 2 locomotives were on display as a billboard for the nearby theme park.

The one shown above is Smoky Mountain Railroad (SM) Consolidation #107. The locomotive was built in 1887 as East Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia #419. SM acquired her from by then owner SOU and renumbered to #107. She was retired in 1954. Since then, she stands at the corner of route 441 and Veterans Blvd. in Pigeon Forge, TN.

The one shown below is SM Mogul #206. The locomotive was built in 1910 as Genesee & Wyoming #9. SM acquired her from by then owner Tennessee and North Carolina. her life at SM was featured in the Lucius Beebe's book "Mixed Train Daily". She was retired in 1954, and is now displayed at Chattanooga, TN.

information resources;

sm_02.jpg: Knoxville, TN autumn, 1970

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Paint Shop – 37 : New Jersey, Indiana and Illinois Boxcar 3478, part 2 [Works_Collection]

njii3478_01.jpg: NJII3478

Here are the data of the car and a belief history of the railroad.

NJI&I 3400 - 3499 series boxcars:
See Paint Shop - 35 : New Jersey, Indiana and Illinois Boxcar 3495, part 2

According to N&W Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment, the “hamburger” herald was used between 1964 and 1971. After the NJI&I parent WAB merger with N&W in 1964, these cars were listed in N&W company records (however, individually in ORER). So, these cars were repainted to this scheme between 1964 and 1971.

New Jersey, Indiana and Illinois Railroad
See Paint Shop - 35 : New Jersey, Indiana and Illinois Boxcar 3495, part 2

I spotted some of the remnants (headquarter, roundhouse and some of the roadbeds), according to the 1967 USGS aerial photo.




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