So-net無料ブログ作成
検索選択
前の6件 | -

Paint Shop – 59 : Minneapolis & St Louis Boxcar 2048, part 2 [Works_Boxcars]

mstl2048_03.jpg: MSTL 2048

Here are the data of the car and a belief history of the railroad.

MSTL 2000 series Boxcars:
Plug doors on freight equipments were came in to use in the early 50’s. MSTL 2000 series cars were built in 1957: one of the early examples of insulated boxcars. In 1956, by then president Albert W. Schroeder had introduced the striking fire engine red and off-white scheme[1]. They were repainted to C&NW scheme after the acquisition[2].

The ORER for July 1974 shows the group #2000 to #2058 with 28 cars in place, described as follows:
AAR Designation RBL, Refrig., Compartmentizers, Even Nos. The inside length of these cars is 50 feet, inside width 9 feet 2 inches, inside height 9 feet 1 inch, outside length 54 feet 9 inches, extreme height 14 feet 1 inch and capacity 4163 cubic feet or 132,000 pounds.


Minneapolis & St Louis Railway (reporting mark MSTL) established in 1870, was the railroad extended south and west from Minneapolis, Minnesota. However the traffic was relatively light, therewith the railroad was in receivership between 1923 and 1943. Conclusively, the railroad was acquired by Chicago & North Western Railway in 1960. Most of the route is abandoned today.
Founder of Sears, Roebuck and Company, Richard Warren Sears(1863 – 1914) was the agent at North Redwood, MN in the 1880s[3].

The map below is the part of Union Pacific Map of the United States printed in 1971, with the MSTL route traced in green line by the author.

[1] Piersen, Joe., (2004) Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad – A Capsule History, Chicago & North Western Historical Society;
[2] 1977 photo of MSTL 2016 in C&NW scheme;
[3] Sears History - 1886, Sears Archives;

mstl-route-map.jpg: MSTL route

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

Paint Shop – 58 : Minneapolis & St Louis Boxcar 2048, part 1 [Works_Boxcars]

mstl2048_01.jpg: MSTL 2048

Minneapolis & St Louis boxcars are familiar to us by its impressive scheme. Thanks to the scheme, we have a lot of HO scale models, but left the N scale models. Accordingly, I decided to make my own using N scale decals produced by Microscale.

Compared to the model photos, prototype photos are relatively few. I could find only one photo on web: MSTL 2038 at RR Photo Archives site. I found another in the book The Model Railroader’s Guide to Freight Cars: MSTL 2048. As this photo was more large and clear, I decided to make #2048.

I used surplus MTL #038 series 50’ Standard Boxcar w/Plug door for the model. I scraped off the molded panel joints on sides and replaced with Archer rivets. I replaced the ends with copied and modified MTL 51’ 3¾” Mechanical Reefer ends. Roof is also replaced with diagonal panel roof copied from Athearn NACC boxcar. Sills are cut, partly added. Roof walk is a MTL product.

I spray painted the body with Mr. Color spray paint #81 Russet. Roof is painted silver. Before applying the decals, I polished the surface of the painted body, where decals were going to be applied, with compound. Decal used is Microscale #60-1509. Semi-gloss clear coat is sprayed after decal is dried.

* photo of MSTL 2038 found at RR Picture Archives.NET;
* decal I used;

mstl2048_02.jpg: MSTL 2048

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

An Expression Derived From Cisco − “Thelma & Louise”, Part 2 [Column_Town of Cisco]

thelma-and-louise_01.jpg

Another scene is not found in the final shooting script; Louise and Thelma stop for a rest at a deserted town. There, Louise encounters an old man with white beard and a hat in front of a shack next to the old gas service station/beauty salon, while Thelma pisses at the outhouse across the railroad track. The scene is said to be the idea of Susan Sarandon[1].

Here, a deserted town is Cisco, old gas service station is the Capansky’s by then out of business, outhouse is the former Rio Grande Telephone booth, and the railroad track is the former Rio Grande, by then Southern Pacific.

I think the two scenes have something in common regarding the treatment of Cisco. In both scenes, Cisco is modified. Capansky’s got cosmetic restoration; out of business cafe changed to beauty salon, gas pump moved to another side and faucet added. Fake laundry was hung out between by then vacant Capansky’s and the Tie House. Cars trampled on private properties. So to say, the movie crews made good use of Cisco. In other words, the identity of Cisco is ignored; we cannot recognize the authentic town or the residents of Cisco.

Ridley Scott might have hired passerby to add a character in his film[2]. The old man appears in the scene above is said to be a Cisco resident/squatter Ernest Vanderhoff (1899 – 1995) who was still keeping claims for two already closed mines in Colorado at that time[3, 4, 5].

[1] Thelma & Louise Trivia web page;
[2] Weller, Sheila (2011) The Ride of a Lifetime, Mar. 2011, Vanity Fair;
[3] D’arc, James V. (2010) When Hollywood Come to Town, Gibbs Smith;
[4] Jun. 13, 1995 Grand Junction Daily Sentinel
[5] The Diggings site;

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

An Expression Derived From Cisco − “Thelma & Louise”, Part 1 [Column_Town of Cisco]

Our model and/or layout are pieces of work driven by the phantasm. However, the phantasm and the actuality don’t coincide with each other: there is a difference between the two. I think the vitals of our hobby are hidden between the two.

Town of Cisco attracts many to this day in spite of/because of its desolation. The desolation may cause phantasms in callers’ minds. Creators who visited Cisco through the ages produced pieces of work driven by their phantasms. Then, in turn, the pieces of works draw another callers (like me) to Cisco.

However, as always, the phantasm and the actuality aren’t the same here at Cisco. Here, I analyze how the creators remixed actual Cisco to produce their piece of works, to extract the vitals of their creation.


thelma-and-louise-poster.jpg: Thelma & Louise poster

Thelma & Louise (1991)
directed by Ridley Scott
written by Callie Khouri
director of photography, Adrian Biddle

Thelma & Louise is a road movie following the track of the two from Arkansas through Oklahoma and Colorado to Arizona. However, the movie was filmed at several spots around Los Angeles, Bakersfield and Moab, Utah; two scenes were filmed at Cisco in August 1990[1].


A scene is found in the final shooting script by Callie Khouri dated June 5, 1990;
Louise and Thelma blow through a stand of buildings left from when the train went through here. There are two parallel streets on either side of the one they're on and, as they pass by buildings, they can see police cars ROARING down these parallel streets trying to "head them off at the pass." Louise FLOORS it and her car screams ahead[2].

Here, a stand of buildings is of Cisco. However, they blow through not parallel streets but private properties of Capansky, Vigil and others. Post office is barely seen behind the dust.

[1] Weller, Sheila (2011) The Ride of a Lifetime, Mar. 2011, Vanity Fair;
[2] Khouri, Callie (1990) “Thelma & Louise” Final Shooting Script;

thelma-and-louise_02.jpg

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

An Expression Derived From Cisco − "Cisco Clifton’s Fillin’ Station", Part 2 [Column_Town of Cisco]

One_piece_at_a_time.jpg: hodge-podge Cadillac

Here, I extract lyrics representing the town and people of Cisco from the song:

Cisco Clifton had a fillin' station
About a mile and a half from town

Regular gas was all that it sold
Except tobacco matches and oil

And once a big black Cadillac
Spent seven dollars there [1]

Who is Cisco Clifton? I’ve never heard of such a resident at Cisco.

According to Jason Fried, Harry Ballard Harris (1914 – 2005, a little over fifty years old then) is the very Cisco Clifton.

Ballard told Jason that he filled Cash’s car up with seven dollars worth of gas[2]. Average annual gas price in 1966 was 32 Cents per gallon[3]. Accordingly, seven dollars worth of gas makes brimming 22 gallons. Anyway, servicing Johnny Cash’s car believed to be the honor[4].

Harry Ballard Harris worked for Utah Department of Transportation between 1946 and 1976. He stationed at Cisco as a road foreman and lived in a house next to Cisco Mercantile on the south at Second Street[5].

He also opened up a gas service station about half a mile west of Cisco on US Route 50/6: his side business first appears in the newspaper dated 1953[6]. After the retirement in 1976, he moved to Dewey, about 14 miles south on Utah State Route 128.

ballard's_ad.jpg: July 21, 1955 Green River Journal


According to Weis again, Johnny Cash listened to the guy who came to operate the Cisco’s only general store where Cash spent dollars for beers. At that time, he was going to sell the business and uproot his little children from their hometown as the business dramatically declined against his will. Cash seemed impressed by the pathos of the father. Therefore, the lyrics below must have been derived from this episode:

And Cisco said I hope my kids fed
When they build that interstate

He wouldn’t say so but Cisco knew
That the Interstate was too much to fight

As far as I researched, Cisco’s only general store then was the Cisco Mercantile owned by William Richard Cowger(1889 – 1971, more than seventy-five years old then). The Mercantile indeed had Coors neon sign on the window. However, he never sold the business nor uprooted his family in his life.

Ray Scott of Cisco Automotive Service and Gerald Spears of Ethel’s Cafe seem also had beers but they didn’t give up their businesses in those days.

Wava and her spouse Ballard Harris did close the post office in 1967. But their children were already married and left Cisco at that time.

The only candidate left was made by Ernest Eugene McCoy (1923 – 1989, a little over fourty then). McCoy, the proprietor of the Ruth’s 66 Cafe and the McCoy’s Service Station since 1963, seems assigned his cafe business to Mervin Jack Mills in 1967[7]. Moreover, McCoy definitely had children: four daughters and three sons[8].

At the end of the song, Cash writes There’s a howdy. The dialect is said to be used in Southern United States. The former Southerner at Cisco I know is William Cowger and Ray Scott both from Texas.

Accordingly, the very Cisco Clifton is not existed. Then, where did the name Cisco Clifton come from? Weis describes that the last name Clifton was taken from one of the folklore names of the original Cisco town: Clifton Station, Martinsdale and Book Cliffs[9].


The conclusion is that Johnny Cash seems politely collected the scattered actualities and assembled the unique character like a mosaic work. Cash added a fictional name made of old and new town names to the character to integrate pieces of actuality he collected. The work is splendid.

However, the phantasm he made became somewhat obscure due to its miscellany: it resembles his One Piece at a Time hodge-podge unknown model Cadillac. For example, how old was Cisco Clifton at that time when he met Johnny Cash?

[1] Cash, Johnny (1967) Cisco Clifton’s Fillin’ Station lylics;
[2] Fried, Jason (2004) Road stories, Signal vs Noise;
[3] Average Historical Gasoline Pump Price, U.S. Department of Energy;
[4] Feb. 19, 1976 Times Independent;
[5] Mary L. Hepperle (2004) “Memories of Cisco”, Canyon Legacy Vol. 51, Dan O’Laurie Canyon County Museum
[6] Oct. 15, 1953 Times Independent;
[7] Jun. 8, 1967 Times Independent;
[8] May 26, 2016 Times Independent;
[9] The name Clifton is also born by a Rio Grande station located 7.5 miles east of Grand Junction, CO along US Route 50/6.

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

An Expression Derived From Cisco − "Cisco Clifton’s Fillin’ Station", Part 1 [Column_Town of Cisco]

Our model and/or layout are pieces of work driven by the phantasm. However, the phantasm and the actuality don’t coincide with each other: there is a difference between the two. I think the vitals of our hobby are hidden between the two.

Town of Cisco attracts many to this day in spite of/because of its desolation. The desolation may cause phantasms in callers’ minds. Creators who visited Cisco through the ages produced pieces of work driven by their phantasms. Then, in turn, the pieces of works draw another callers (like me) to Cisco.

However, as always, the phantasm and the actuality aren’t the same here at Cisco. Here, I analyze how the creators remixed actual Cisco to produce their piece of works to extract the vitals of their creation.


from-sea-to-shinning-sea.jpg: album, From Sea to Shinning Sea (1968)
 
Cisco Clifton’s Fillin’ Station by Johnny Cash

John Ray “Johnny” Cash (1932 – 2003) was a country music singer-songwriter born at Kingsland, Arkansas. Related to our hobby, he made a TV Special and a song Ridin’ The Rails for Lionel Trains in 1974. His 1975 album Destination Victoria Station, a special product only offered at Victoria Station Restaurant, was all consisted of train related songs. I also remember a photo of him standing with his guitar on the front deck of L&N locomotive in Trains magazine.

Johnny Cash live recordings database site shows Cash gave performance, every summer from 1960 to 1967, at the Lagoon in Salt Lake City[1]. In 1965 and 1966, his schedule the day before and after Salt Lake City was the performance at Morrison, Colorado Springs and Denver, Colorado. Why he not drove US Route 50/6 through Cisco?

According to Weis, indeed, Johnny Cash was a caller at Cisco one day, stayed into the evening, and spent $7.11 for beers[2]. Later, he was said to have written a song titled Cisco Clifton’s Fillin’ Station: The song was recorded in Mar/Apr 1967, and released in 1968.

[1] Johnny Cash live recordings database;
[2] Weis, Norman D., (1977) Helldorados, Caxton Printers


 
 

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 
前の6件 | -
D&RGW
Ring Owner: Nathan Holmes Site: D&RGW Site Ring
Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet
Get Your Free Web Ring
by Bravenet.com