So-net無料ブログ作成
前の6件 | -

Arboles Water Tank [DRGW Photo Archives]

arboles-tank_01.jpg
arboles-tank_02.jpg

This is one of the Rio Grande original facilities remain along its route in Colorado; the water tank at Arboles.


The water supply facilities here at Arboles is quite simple compared with that at Cisco, Utah. The source is a few feet from the track. Moreover, they have no coalhouse or pumper’s dwelling since 1962, as the facilities were relocated that year due to the construction of Navajo Dam.


The unusual water tank was made from the tender of M-75 class steam locomotive #1600[1]. As the locomotive was scrapped in 1949, the tank seems the product of that time.

According to the barely remaining flying Rio Grande logo on it, the crew chopped the coal bunker and front-end off, then tucked engineer’s side into and formed the new front-end. Inside the wall under the tank contains only piping. The paint color is the later alteration.


Wood frame structure lapped with brick pattern tarpaper seems the shed, not the pump house because of its position: it also lacks marks of smoke stack. The structure was also relocated. According to the old photo, it originally stood next to the tank on the same side of main track[2]. The facilities were retired collectively in 1968.

All photos taken on Sep. 7, 2017

[1] Holmes, Nathan (2007) “Arboles, CO”, DRGW.NET;
[2] photo of the tank before relocation found at Friend of Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad webpage;
* photo of M-75 class steam locomotive with flying Rio Grande logo;

arboles-tank_03.jpg
 
 

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

Rio Grande as a Lifeline – Water Supply at Cisco, Part 3 [Column_Town of Cisco]

Residents of Cisco practically relied their water supply on Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad[1]. The railroad supplied the water since the establishment of the town and to the 50’s. However, the railroad abandoned the system in 1955[2]. Here are the photos of the remainder:

All photos taken on Sep. 10, 2017.


Reservoirs

cisco-pipe-line_05.jpg: the town of Cisco appears far left
cisco-pipe-line_06.jpg: 6” pipe, maybe an overflow, sticking out from the foreground bank

The reservoirs were constructed on the hill at the highest point between Cisco Landing and Cisco, about a mile east of the town. According to the 1919 ICC Valuation Map, two almond-shaped concrete reservoirs had the capacity of 200,000 gallon each.

The pipeline would run through between two reservoirs guarded by the barbed wire fence. However, the south side reservoir was out of order by the time of abolition[2].


Steel Water Tank

cisco-pipe-line_07.jpg
cisco-pipe-line_10.jpg

The original wood water tank which stood next to the depot was replaced by the 100,000 gallon steel water tank opposite the depot, maybe in the late 20’s[3, 4]. The steel tank was retired in 1955 and dismantled in 1958[5, 6]. Here, I represent the former Rio Grande water tank at Thompson, which was also dismantled and moved in 1958[7]. The shed next to the former Thompson tank seems also a Rio Grande heritage.

Represented below for reference is the photo of ATSF 145,000 gallon water tank built in 1903 at Ribera, New Mexico.

[1] arx (2015) "Rio Grande as a Lifeline – Water Supply at Cisco", Boxcar Red Collection;
[2] Mar. 10, 1955 Times Independent;
[3] Jun. 7, 1928 Times Independent;
[4] Jul. 26, 1928 Times Independent;
[5] Mar. 10, 1955 Times Independent;
[6] Ozment, Jim (1958) water tank @ Cisco, UT;
[7] Oct. 16, 1958 Times Independent;
 
ribera-watertank.jpg: water tank at Ribera, NM
cisco-pump_map.jpg: Cisco Pipe Line system map

続きを読む


コメント(0) 

Rio Grande as a Lifeline – Water Supply at Cisco, Part 2 [Column_Town of Cisco]

cisco-pipe-line_01.jpg: Colorado River at Cisco Landing

Residents of Cisco practically relied their water supply on Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad[1]. The railroad supplied the water since the establishment of the town and to the 50’s.

The source of the culinary water was the Colorado River about four miles east of the town. The epic water supply system named “Cisco Pipe Line” installed by the railroad in 1883 is well represented in the ICC Valuation Map drawn in 1919 and revised in 1927[2]. According to the Map, Pump H’se No. 25, Coal H’se No. 28, Pumper’s Dwg No. 26 and W.C. No.27 at Cisco Landing, two concrete reservoirs on the hill, a water tank at Cisco and the 6" steel pipe connecting the facilities formed the system.

Successive foremen and their family resided by the pump house: Charles E. Johns in 1900, Roscoe C. Hallett in 1940, was the “pumper” according to the Census. A few ranchers such as Devine, Jacob and Campbell along the Colorado River were their neighbors[3]. The new schoolhouse was built in 1903[4].

However, the railroad abandoned the system in 1955[5]. The steel water tank at Cisco seems removed in 1958, along with the tank at Thompson[6, 7]. The rest is left in the terrain. Here are the photos of the remainder:

All photos taken on Sep. 10, 2017.


Pump House

cisco-pipe-line_02.jpg: pump house exterior
cisco-pipe-line_03.jpg: smoke stack lying inside
cisco-pipe-line_04.jpg: remains of the plumbing
Steam-Water-Pump.jpg: pumphouse interior at Gato[9]

This frame structure with gabled wood shingles roof still stands on the bank of Colorado River at Cisco Landing. Inside the structure remain a smoke stack and pump/plumbing. As it used to burn natural gas in its final days, coal facilities seem dismantled long ago[8].

Represented above for reference is the interior photo of the pump house at Gato, Colorado[9].


Pumper’s Dwelling

cisco-pipe-line_09.jpg: historical marker established by BLM
cisco-pipe-line_08.jpg: foundation of a structure
pumphouse-aerial-photo.jpg: 1952 USGS aerial photo of the site

A foundation of a structure is preserved at Cisco Landing near the pump house.
The BLM marker in front of the remains describes this as the remains of Ernest E. Campbell (1867 – 1937) homestead. However, according to the land patent, his homestead is filed at about three miles south of Cisco Landing[10]. Moreover, the site this foundation lies is within the D&RG property marked in 1919 ICC Valuation Map. Accordingly, I believe this remains as the foundation of Pumper’s Dwg No. 26 represented in the ICC Map.

[1] arx (2015) "Rio Grande as a Lifeline – Water Supply at Cisco", Boxcar Red Collection;
[2] Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Colorado/Utah Stateline to Green River, UT ICC Valuation Maps, Colorado Railroad Museum
[3] Bennett, Lee A., (2009) A History of Selected Ranches on a Twenty-mile Stretch of the Colorado River in Grand County, Utah. Bennett Management Services, LLC
[4] Nov. 1, 1923 Times independent;
[5] Mar. 10, 1955 Times Independent;
[6] Oct. 16, 1958 Times Independent;
[7] Ozment, Jim (1958) water tank @ Cisco, UT;
[8] Oct. 15, 1923 Times Independent;
[9] Farnsworth, Vince (2015) "Pagosa Junction Surprise", Farnsworth Scenics;
[10] Campbell homestead entry map;

cisco-pump_map.jpg: Cisco Pipe Line system map

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

Surfaces - Everyday Life in the Early 70’s [Photo Archives_Roadside]


Here, I introduce scanned images from my dad’s slides mostly taken in the early 70’s. 1964 Oldsmobile was our only choice for means of family trip to as north as Fairbanks, AK or to as south as Oaxaca, Mexico: we never used airlines. Accordingly, I decided to call this series of posts as “Surfaces”.


1970_71_US_0863.jpg: Knoxville, TN 1970

Go! Vols!!

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

Surfaces - Everyday Life in the Early 70’s [Photo Archives_Roadside]

 
Here, I introduce scanned images from my dad’s slides mostly taken in the early 70’s. 1964 Oldsmobile was our only choice for means of family trip to as north as Fairbanks, AK or to as south as Oaxaca, Mexico: we never used airlines. Accordingly, I decided to call this series of posts as “Surfaces”.


1970_71_US_0854.jpg: Knoxville, TN 1971

We can’t escape annual events.

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 

Reminders of the 70’s along Rio Grande 87 – Dunham’s Fruit Stand, Green River [Photo Archives_Roadside]

dunham-stand_01.jpg

Dunham’s Fruit Stand is a roadside stand selling melons and watermelons. The stand is operated by Dunham Farm. According to Utah Division of State History Historic Building Search, this Bungalow style commercial building was built in 1925[1].

Fredrick Eugene (1928 – 2004) and Nancy Dunham moved to Green River from Grand Junction in 1955[2]. They bought the farm from Howard Eugene Silliman (1914 – 1999). Their son Chris seems succeeded the business in 1995[3].

Dunham Farm, Vetere Farm and Thayn Farm support the Green River Melon Days Festival held every September[4].

All photos taken on Sep. 10, 2017.

[1] Utah Division of State History Historic Building Search form;
[2] Jul. 28, 1955 Green River Journal;
[3] Dunham Farm information at Manta.com webpage;
[4] Melon Days official webpage;

dunham-stand_02.jpg

Japanese & Comments


コメント(0) 
前の6件 | -
D&RGW
Ring Owner: Nathan Holmes Site: D&RGW Site Ring
Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet Free Site Ring from Bravenet
Get Your Free Web Ring
by Bravenet.com